Chapter 53: Treasure

Virtually anything can be considered treasure. The type(s) of treasure dealt with in this chapter are those substances whose physical nature are the prime properties in determining their worth. An obvious example is gold—although it has many valuable chemical properties, it has has been highly prized for centuries for its rarity.

To use an example more gaming related, a fusion pistol has a value of 200 000 because it is a deadly, violent, and efficient weapon; but a sliver of orgone crystal may be worth 500 000 for no readily apparent reason. Therefore the nature of treasure is heavily dependant on the scenario. Something may be common and worthless in your particular scenario, yet be awarded great value in the treasure system (or vice versa). When this occurs it is up to the ref to use her imagination to accommodate the circumstances.

Treasure with very high value can also drastically affect the outcome of a campaign, and the ref is expected to use creative means to alleviate the problems that arise from this.

One problem which may arise when using the treasure system is the possible bizarre results of the random rolls. For example, a treasure could be a groin ornament made of water and quartz which is sewn on. Such is the roll of the dice, and the ref must use her ingenuity, and possibly a little humor to deal with such a weird occurrence.

The format of the treasure may also cause problems. Treasure is not only gold or jewels, but includes antiques, information, and bizarre jewelry (as above). In many cases, the treasure must be cashed in before its value can be divided amongst the personas in the expedition.

Personas that insist on discarding valuable antique chairs, expensive lamp shades, and other such seemingly trivial items are only making themselves poorer at the refs amusement.

The referee should have fun with this chapter. The items that the personas can acquire are down right silly and that should be the tone of treasure, and the whole game for that matter. Serious referees will have trouble with this chapter, and like anything else if it it causing you trouble throw it out. Treasure is notorious, especially ornaments, for having many rolls leading to very little in the way of toys. Remember that everyone needs practise rolling dice, and the more you roll the luckier you are.

Arrgh space pirate plunder.
Arrgh space pirate plunder.

Value

The treasure value consists of two parts: the Base Value, and the Base Value Multiplier. The Base Value is determined by a deci dice roll (see Base Value Table), and can vary from 1 to 1 000 000 (yes one million).

The Base Value Multiplier is also rolled on deci dice, and the number generated (between 1 and 100) is multiplied by the Base Value to determine the actual value of the treasure. For example, a deci dice roll of 38 indicates, via the table, a Base Value of 10. A second deci dice roll of 21 yields a Base Value Multiplier of 21. Thus the value of the treasure is 210. During times of economic recession, the treasure Base Value Multiplier could be reduced to a 1d10, and during times of economic boon, perhaps a kilo-die.

Table 53.1 Treasure Value

Treasure that is either a starting artifact or a found cache of moola. If this is being rolled as a TOY, anything less that <4242 in value should not count as a TOY roll.
Die Roll (1d100)Base ValueComment
Die RollBase Comment
01-10Random JunqueDoes not count as a TOY roll.
11-201Times 1d100
21-4010Times 1d100
41-60100Times 1d100
61-801000Times 1d100
81-9010 000Times 1d100
91-95100 000Times 1d100
96-98Random ToyDoes not count as a TOY or last roll.
991 000 000Times 1d100
00Ref's Own Table

Format

Presently, treasure is nothing more than a value awaiting some form. The treasure formats give the treasure some tangible, identifiable character. Format is rolled on Table 53.2:  Treasure Format.

Table 53.2 Treasure Format

One persona's treasure is another persona's junk.
Die Roll Format
01-101)Substance
11-202)Stone
21-303)Ornament
31-404)Information
41-505)Relic
51-856)Cash
86-997)Mixed
00Ref's Own Table

1) Substance

Table 53.3: Treasure Substance Type is surprisingly short. It is composed of those elements and minerals most commonly considered valuable. Whether the materials are valuable due to scarcity or other factors depends on the ref. The list of substances can and should be added to by the ref. The treasure’s wate is also up to the ref, of the five formats listed the substance format should be the heaviest. When the value of the substance is truly exorbitant (hence large wates), the ref may wish to present the substance in the form of a mine, a factory, or some other such source of massive wealth.

Table 53.3 Substance Type

For some inexplicable (that means the ref has to explain it) this stuff has the assigned value.
Die Roll (1d100)Substance
Die RollSubstance
01-02Bone
03-04Clay
05-06Copper
07-08Congealed Sputum
09-10Cotton
11-12Dirt
13-14Electrum
15-16Enermium
17-18Foam Rubber
19-20Foam Froth
21-22FoodStuff
23-24Glass, Transparent
25-26Glass, Coloured
27-28Gold
29-30Gold, White
31-32Granite
33-34Helium
35-36Herbs
37-38Lead
39-40Graphite
41-42Linen
43-44Paint
45-46Paper, Blank
47-48Paper, Bales
49-50Plants
51-52Plastic
53-54Patinum
55-56Plutonium
57-58Polyester
59-60Rock
61-62Rubber
63-64Silver
65-66Spices
67-68Slag
69-70Water
71-72Wax
72-74Wire
75-76Wood
77-78Lint, Dryer
79-80Lint, Belly Button
81-82Hides
83-84Oil
85-86Marmalade
87-88Hair
89-90Fur
91-92Teeth
93-94Metal Shavings
95-96Cream, Congealed
97-98Manure
99-00Ref's Own Table

3) Stone

Crystal is a generic term imprecisely used to include gems, crystals and other shiny baubles. Crystals are less descriptive than other formats because they are objects commonly associated with treasure and fortune.

How the crystals are presented is the responsibility of the referee. Whether it is one valuable gem, or a collection of many less valuable ones depends on the scenario that has been created. The ref should remember that wate is not the only value determinant of a crystal, and that it may possess other valuable properties. Very valuable crystals should have some history attached to them. If the valuable gem stone does not have a back story then one should quickly develop. To determine the crystal type roll on Table 53.4: Stone Type.

Table 53.4 Stone Type

What kind of stupid culture would assign an artificial value to a rock? Diamonds...
Die Roll (1d100)Stone Type
Die RollStone Type
01-05Agate
06-10Amethyst
11-15Azurite
16-20Coral
21-25Diamond
26-30Emerald
31-35Garnet
36-40Jade
41-45Jasper
46-50Obsidian
51-55Onyx
56-60Opal
61-65Pearl
66-70Quartz
71-75Ruby
76-80Sapphire
81-85Topaz
86-90Turquoise
91-95Mixed Two from above
96-00Ref's Own Table

3) Ornament

Ornaments are trinkets designed to adorn the body of the wearer. Regardless of the value of the ornament, it will always consist of a single object. E.g., one ring worth 1000, not ten rings worth 100 each. Valuable ornaments will almost certainly have a history, and perhaps even a name. This system can only provide a general idea of the nature of the ornament. Final details are left to the artistic imagery of the referee.  An ornament is valuable because of the way that it has been assembled, and ransacking it for its primary elements may render it worthless—tearing the diamond from a diamond ring, for instance.

 The ornaments are created in three steps: 1) Composition on Table 53.5: Ornament Composition. This determines what the ornament is made out of. 2) By what body part ornament adorns  (refer to Table 53.6: Ornament Location).  3) how they are attached (refer to Table 53.7: Ornament Application).  

Table 53.5 Ornament Composition

Determine the basic structure of this valuable adornment.
Die Roll (1d100)CompositionComment
Die RollCompositionComment
01-20One StoneRoll on Table 53.4
21-40Multiple StonesTwo rolls on 53.4
41-60One SubstanceA wearable amount from Table 53.3
61-80Substance plus StoneStone is set in the substance.
81-95Mixed SubstanceMixed wearable amounts.
96-99Miniature RelicWearable sized relic.
00Ref's Own Table

Table 53.6 Ornament Location

Determine the location where the ornament is attached to the vain persona. Not just anthropomorphs but aliens as well.
Die Roll (1d100)Location of Adornment
Die RollLocation
01-04Abdomen
05-08Ankle
09-12Biceps
13-16Calf
17-20Ear
21-24Eyelid
25-28Foot
29-32Fore head
33-36Fur
37-40Groin
41-44Hair
45-48Hand
49-52Hip
53-56Knee
57-60Lips
61-64Mouth
65-72Teeth
73-76Neck
77-80Nose
81-84Pectoral
85-88Thigh
89-92Wrist
93-96Internally
97-99Mixed Two of above.
00Ref's Own Table

Table 53.7 Application Method

Determine how the treasured ornament is attached to the vain persona.
Die Roll (1d100)Application Type
Die Roll Application Type
01-13Applied (glued on)
14-26Fitted (ring, bracelet, crown)
27-39Pinned (to clothes or flesh)
40-53Sewn On
54-66Strapped (chains, ropes)
67-79Suction Cups
80-92Carried
93-99Balanced
00Ref's Own Table

4) Information

Valuable information should consist of pointless facts which in no way affect the campaign or scenario at hand, but which are potentially saleable to some referee persona, data bank, or newspaper. Information could be personal messages, corporate plans, or top secret intelligence. The wate (kg) of the information is decided by the referee—info worth millions scrawled on the back of a napkin is convenient for the personas, but is susceptible to various tragedies. How the information is stored is determined by a roll on Table 53.8: Information Storage. Nine times out of ten the information will be in an encrypted format.

Table 53.8 Information Type

Information is power. Determine what medium the information is stored on.
Die Roll (1d100)Format
Die RollFormat
01-10Aural (spoken)
11-20Cassette
21-30Chips, hardwired
31-40Computer cards
41-50Crystalline
51-60Floppy discs
61-70Little Golden Book
71-80Paper tape
81-90Plastic discs
91-99Written on Parchment
00Other

5) Relic

A relic is a piece of random junque applied arbitrary value for obtuse cultural reasons. The object can be a luxury piece of random junk: an antique; a souvenir (owned by some important someone); or commodity shipment consisting of many units of random junk. Specialized random junk is rolled on the Random Junque Tables, and accorded whatever value was determined by the treasure system. Go to the random junk tables, and determine what the persona is getting. If the treasure is worth less than 50 eps then roll another treasure, but do not discard the first one.

6) Cash

What a dull way to find a pile of treasure. The cash may be simply a pile of cash, or credit chit, or some other format of storing cash. Use Table 53.8: Information Storage if you do not want to bother with standard value currency. Other tricks are to have the money in one currency and requiring transfer to another. Smaller amounts of cash money should just be given to the personas. That is called being nice.

Table 53.9 Cash Presentation

Nothing like cash.
Die Roll (1d100)Cash Presentation
Die RollCash Presentation
01-10Bag, Paper
11-20Bag, Plastic
21-30Cheque, Paper
31-40Credit Card
41-50Coins
51-60Mattress, Inside
61-70Other Currency
71-80Promissary Note
81-90Mortgage Paper
91-99Line of Credit
00Other

7) Mixed

As if things are not mixed up enough it EXP. Mixed treasures will have their values mixed amongst the basic treasure types found here. For example a relic  or an ornament could be a form of cash. Cash  or stone could be information. Just shakes things up a bit.

Table 53.10 Mixed Treasure

As if it wasn't confusing enough already.
Die Roll (1d100)Combination
Die RollCombination
01-10Info Substance
11-20Info Ornament
21-30Info Relic
31-40Info Stone
41-50Cash Substance
51-60Cash Stone
61-70Cash Relic
71-80Cash Ornament
81-90Artifact TOY Cash
91-99Artifact TOY Info
00Ref's Own Table